70+
PARTICIPATING FACULTY MEMBERS
16
COOPERATING DEPARTMENTS
10
RESEARCH FACILITIES

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Graduate Program in Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology (CMDB) is to prepare students for successful research careers in the life sciences, leading to awarding of M.S. and Ph.D. degrees.  Our curriculum emphasizes comprehensive and interdisciplinary training in experimental biology at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels, coupled with acquisition of the laboratory skills necessary to generate new knowledge as a research scientist.

 

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Our Research

The Interdepartmental Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology Graduate Program offers both Doctoral and Masters of Science degrees with a heavy dose of research in basic, applied, agricultural, and biomedical sciences. A genomics institute (with facilities of nucleotide and peptide synthesis, DNA sequencing and cell transformation) Be it bioethics, proteomics or plant cell pathology, the partnerships between faculty and students at CMDB keep them at the forefront of their fields.

 

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Science News

artists rendering of ikaria wariootia
Ancestor of all animals identified in Australian fossils
A wormlike creature that lived more than 555 million years ago is the earliest bilaterian
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How associative fear memory is formed in the brain
UC Riverside mouse study provides insights into how pathological fear memory in PTSD could be suppressed
Read More »aboutHow associative fear memory is formed in the brain
Biochemist spins out joint venture company with Atomwise
Over the past few years, biochemist John Jefferson Perry at the University of California, Riverside, has collaborated on a number of projects with Atomwise Inc., a company that uses artificial intelligence, or AI, for drug discovery. Now Perry and the company have formed a joint venture called Theia Biosciences.
Read More »aboutBiochemist spins out joint venture company with Atomwise
corn roots in the ground
Some domesticated plants ignore beneficial soil microbes
Domestication yielded bigger crops often at the expense of plant microbiomes
Read More »aboutSome domesticated plants ignore beneficial soil microbes
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