70+
PARTICIPATING FACULTY MEMBERS
16
COOPERATING DEPARTMENTS
10
RESEARCH FACILITIES

Mission & Vision

The mission of the Graduate Program in Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology (CMDB) is to prepare students for successful research careers in the life sciences, leading to awarding of M.S. and Ph.D. degrees.  Our curriculum emphasizes comprehensive and interdisciplinary training in experimental biology at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels, coupled with acquisition of the laboratory skills necessary to generate new knowledge as a research scientist.

 

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Our Research

The Interdepartmental Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology Graduate Program offers both Doctoral and Masters of Science degrees with a heavy dose of research in basic, applied, agricultural, and biomedical sciences. A genomics institute (with facilities of nucleotide and peptide synthesis, DNA sequencing and cell transformation) Be it bioethics, proteomics or plant cell pathology, the partnerships between faculty and students at CMDB keep them at the forefront of their fields.

 

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Science News

Trappist-1 system
Surprising number of exoplanets could host life
A new UC Riverside study shows other stars could have as many as seven Earth-like planets in the absence of a gas giant like Jupiter. 
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grape leaf galls
Scientists unlock genetic secrets of wine growers’ worst enemy
Following a decade-long effort, scientists have mapped out the genome of an aphid-like pest capable of decimating vineyards. In so doing, they have discovered how it spreads — and potentially how to stop it. 
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Using artificial intelligence to smell the roses
UC Riverside study applies machine learning to olfaction with possible vast applications in flavors and fragrances
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Rattlesnake coiled up
Hot or cold, venomous vipers still quick to strike
Most reptiles move slower when temperatures drop, but venomous rattlesnakes appear to be an exception. The cold affects them, but not as much as scientists expected. 
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